This is about growing food in Brooklyn. For the first time.

One Way Ticket

I will not be continuing the urban homestead project in Brooklyn this year.  I am living in Buenos Aires where the Autumn is approaching and outdoor space is tough to come by.  All of the dirt, containers, compost, and tools were donated to the school garden at PS307 in Brooklyn- stop by and check it out! 

You can follow my adventures in South America at my new blog,  One Way Ticket.             (http://jordanrogoff.tumblr.com/)

You can see a condensed version of Patches&Pockets from start to finish, by clicking HERE.  

Thank you for all of your support!  Keep tillin’…

The chickens at Casa Verde in Patagonia.  Trevelin, Argentina February 2012

My sugarbabies!  These little cuties were delicious and very easy to grow.  One plant in a big bucket produced two melons and had it not been for Hurricane Irene, these may have grown a bit larger.  In any case, they were fragrant, crispy, juicy and sweet and perfect for the rooftop.  I would recommend watermelons as a first-time crop for any new gardeners and there are so many fun varieties to play with.

The heirloom Black Krim tomatoes were a success!  I chose this variety because unlike other heirlooms, they become red and ripe before becoming so large as to plunge to the ground below them.  Next time I will try more than one variety and I don’t think I will use the SIPs again.  The construction was time-consuming and expensive and despite the promise of less frequent watering, I still found myself hauling several buckets of water a day to the roof to keep the wick saturated.  After the wick became dried out I began to top water the SIP’s and the tomatoes have not showed a sign of distress for the difference. 

The compost turned out fluffy and fragrant!  I used it as mulch to add nutrients back to the soil after weeks of heavy rain.

The compost turned out fluffy and fragrant!  I used it as mulch to add nutrients back to the soil after weeks of heavy rain.

City Living

I have become a daring, expert ladder climber.

I learned that dark, leafy greens are extremely easy to grow.  The heirloom varieties of Five Color Silverbeet Swiss Chard, Red Russian Kale, and Dino/Tuscan Kale produced many delicious suppers, shown here lightly sauteed with garlic and served with creamy cheddar polenta.

One heirloom Rosa Bianca eggplant plant in a small container produced about 3 eggplants this season.  I harvested the first one too late, once it became yellow and bitter, so I am preserving it to save the seeds.  This one is just about ready, right in time for the first frost.

One heirloom Rosa Bianca eggplant plant in a small container produced about 3 eggplants this season.  I harvested the first one too late, once it became yellow and bitter, so I am preserving it to save the seeds.  This one is just about ready, right in time for the first frost.

The pride and joy of my garden.  I started dozens of these heirloom Rosa Biaca Eggplants from seed and only this one survived.  It looks absolutely lovely now and the vibrant purple flowers are giving way to spikey pods, which give way finally to shiny, plump, violet globes.  I threw in a photo of the baby plant for nostalgia.

Rainbow Greens!

This mix of Red Russian and Tuscan kale plus Rainbow Chard tastes great massaged with lemon juice and kosher salt or stir fried quickly with garlic and grapeseed oil and topped with chili oil.

I am so excited for these Sugar Baby Watermelons to be ready.  They grow so much everyday!  I threw in a photo of the baby plants for old time’s sake.

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